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Podcast episode

EP87 – Saving & investing for retirement: 401(k)s, IRAs, mutual funds, ETFs, etc

In Episode 87 of Economics Explored, host Gene Tunny discusses saving and investing for retirement with Sarah Holden, Senior Director of Retirement & Investor Research at the Investment Company Institute (ICI). ICI is the leading association representing regulated funds globally, including US mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Sarah has a Ph.D. in economics and has studied retirement trends and policy, as well as the behavior of investors, for decades. She uses humor and plain English to make retirement and investment concepts clear. Sarah is based in Washington, DC and Gene spoke with her over Zoom on 12 May 2021. 

Links relevant to the conversation include:

ICI Education Foundation (ICIEF)

ICI webpage on 401(k)s

ICI webpage on IRA

Get on the road to investing

A Random Walk Down Wall Street: The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing

Australia vs US: A scorecard on the Australian and US Defined Contribution Systems

Please send through any questions, comments or suggestions to contact@economicsexplored.com and Gene will aim to address them in a future episode.

Categories
Podcast episode

EP65 – Behavioural Finance with Dr Tracey West

The latest episode of my Economics Explored podcast considers the emerging field of behavioural finance, which is basically the application of behavioural economics to finance. It considers lessons from this field for households, investors, and governments. The episode features an interview I conducted earlier this week with Dr Tracey West of the Griffith Business School.

Tracey teaches behavioural finance to undergraduates and postgraduates at Griffith’s Gold Coast (Queensland, Australia) campus. She’s also an active commentator on economic policy issues. For instance, last year, Tracey wrote an excellent Conversation article on 3 lessons from behavioural economics Bill Shorten’s Labor Party forgot about, three lessons which Tracey and I consider in our conversation. Those lessons are:

1. People are loss averse

2. Limited decision-making

3. Now is worth more than later (and much more so than economists would typically assume using typical discount rates).

Tracey and I had a great discussion about behavioural finance theory and practice, including the need for regulation of financial markets and investments. The Storm Financial collapse, which wrecked the finances of many North Queenslanders, was given as an example illustrating the need for regulation of financial investments. I hope you enjoy our conversation. A transcript is available via my business website.

Links relevant to the conversation include:

Tracey’s LinkedIn profile

Tracey’s academic publications via Google Scholar